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Dada Masilo

Carmen

Maison de la Danse, Théâtre du Vellein, Villefontaine

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SEP
Dada Masilo
WorldPremiere 106x103

Working on Carmen means working with the history of its interpretations. And, for Dada Masilo, it is also the best way to tell a story of sex, death and domination, and to prove the narrative power of dance.

Ophelia, Juliette, Odile/Odette, Carmen: the extraordinarily playful and phenomenal South African choreographer has developed a habit of serving up forceful heroines. For the record, two years ago at the Lyon Biennale, Dada Masilo, a ballerina on a rampage, set fire to Swan Lake. She was out to take revenge on a repertory that had rejected her. With tutus for all, toe shoes and bare feet, arabesques and Zulu energy, her Swan Lake indulged in any and every transgression, even a Prince Siegfried flirting with an obviously male black swan. But her joyful iconoclasm doesn’t ignore social issues: sexism, AIDS, racism and homosexuality, reinterpreted in dance, show us that the world’s wrongs remain to be righted. Reinvigorated this way, the classics can hold onto their pirouettes but the turbulent and fast-paced moves of Dada Masilo also have their place. Her Carmen follows the same pattern. To bolster her hot-blooded but vulnerable heroine, the choreographer turned to flamenco, without forgetting the awe she felt at Mats Ek’s Carmen (1998) and the sharpened rhythms of Rodion Shchedrin’s 1967 adaptation of Bizet for strings and percussion. “Carmen is everything your mother tells you not to do,” says Dada Masilo, with glee. “From a choreographic perspective, I wanted to throw myself into a selfmade hell.” So forget about shyness and good manners. This Carmen, eroticised to the extreme, speaks of power, sex, rape and manipulation, delightedly embracing the narrative power of dance. A narration Dada Masilo chose for herself, she who had been trained at the Dance Factory of Johannesburg, and then left Anne Teresa de Keersmaecker’s P.A.R.T.S. to get away from abstraction. “In the end,” she explains, “I wanted to create an interpretation that would allow me and the dancers to do what we love most – dance.”

Maison de la Danse

Dates et horaires

  • Sat 20 Sep20:30
  • Sun 21 Sep15:00
  • Sun 21 Sep19:30
  • Mon 22 Sep19:30
  • Tue 23 Sep20:30
  • Wed 24 Sep19:30
  • Thu 25 Sep20:30
  • Durée : 1h10 env. environ

Plein tarif

  • 1re série 29€
  • 2ème série 25€

Tarif réduit

  • 1re série 26€
  • 2ème série 22€

Abonnement

  • CatégorieA

Théâtre du Vellein, Villefontaine

Dates et horaires

  • Sat 27 Sep20:30
  • Sun 28 Sep18:00
  • Durée : 1h10 env. environ

Tarifs

  • Plein tarif 29€
  • Tarif réduit 26€

Abonnement

  • CatégorieA

Piece for 14 dancers — 2014 — Run time 1h10 approx.

Chorégraphe : Dada Masilo

Compagnie : The Dance Factory — Musique : Georges Bizet, Rodion Chtchedrin, Arvo Pärt — Création lumière : Suzette Le Sueur

Accueil : Maison de la Danse, Biennale de la danse

Production The Dance Factory / Suzette Le Sueur, Interarts Lausanne / Chantal et Jean-Luc Larguier. Coproduction Biennale de la danse de Lyon, Théâtre du Rond-Point - Paris, Les Théâtres de la Ville de Luxembourg, Espace des Arts - Chalon-sur-Saône, Théâtre en Dracénie - Draguignan, La Rampe - La Ponatière Scène conventionnée - Échirolles.

Avec le soutien de la Région Rhône-Alpes dans le cadre de l’APSV
Co-réalisation : Maison de la Danse / Biennale de la danse

Photo © John Hogg - Portrait © Suzy Bernstein